An extinct angel (homage to Georg Trakl)

The near stillness recalls what is forgotten, extinct angels.

Georg Trakl

extinct-angels-georg-trakl

Georg Trakl was an Austrian poet. He is considered one of the most important Austrian Expressionists.

Life and Work

Trakl was born and lived the first 18 years of his life in Salzburg, Austria. His father, Tobias Trakl (11 June 1837, Ödenburg/Sopron – 1910), was a dealer of hardware from Hungary, while his mother, Maria Catharina Halik (17 May 1852, Wiener Neustadt – 1925), was a housewife of Czech descent with strong interests in art and music.

http://www.poemhunter.com/georg-trakl/biography/

A wolf, a wolf!

wolf-window

Response Poem to David Attenborough – I wrote a while back!

“Crying wolf is a real danger.”

Now, if you may want to know everything…

You may never know what wolves are on.

Tales in fables describe how ghastly they are.

You may assume to carry on for not being one,

The wolf is tough and not amid into vanishing.

Furthermore named wolf, not seen and said by one,

Spotted and slurred by another pack, called sheep.

No plights for me, how many there are into howling.

Alive, as they repeat their shout: “A wolf, a wolf!!”

 

Nelly

Not even a burn

not-harmed

In the halfway of our earthly life,
I found myself lost in a gloomy wood
Gone off from the trail; straight to hell
It wasn’t easy battle to fend off danger
It wasn’t known how wild the fire was
Although I managed to walk just through it
And nothing harmed me, not even a burn.

Poem by Nelly

at NelleyPen

 

Is the ‘Egg’ big enough for you?

goose-laid-goldBigger version

The Goose laid a huge egg, so you won’t need to kill it!

There’s nothing much to say, when every time I try to voice my opinion someone gets upset and revengeful. Using up everything you have at once by insatiable spending on useless stuff. Here’s an Aesop’s Fables or the Aesopica is a vast collection of fables attributed to Aesop, a storyteller believed to have lived in ancient Greece between 620 and 564 BCE.

The Goose That Laid the Golden Eggs, one of the best known Aesop’s Fables

To kill the Goose That Laid the Golden Eggs’ is an idiom used of an unprofitable action motivated by greed. It refers to one of Aesop’s Fables, numbered 87 in the Perry Index.

Aesops Fables The Goose That Laid Golden Egg

Audio Books Published on 12 Aug 2014

A man and his wife owned a very special goose. Every day the goose would lay a golden egg, which made the couple very rich. “Just think,” said the man’s wife, “If we could have all the golden eggs that are inside the goose, we could be richer much faster.” “You’re right,” said her husband, “We wouldn’t have to wait for the goose to lay her egg every day.” So, the couple killed the goose and cut her open, only to find that she was just like every other goose. She had no golden eggs inside of her at all, and they had no more golden eggs.

Politically Unbalanced

america-politics

Water and Jeff got it right on!

Walter is a retired, grumpy old man with arms always crossed in discontent.

Dunham created the Walter puppet himself, including both the initial sculpture and the silicone mold, though he eventually began using professional effects companies for the latter stages with his subsequent puppets

Walter’s thoughts on the 2016 election | JEFF DUNHAM: Politically Unbalanced Ep. 1

Published on May 6, 2016

Walter has a few thoughts on the 2016 election…

Have fun!

No matter what happens

After a while.jpg

After a long while in the shadowed stream of life, as we live on for half a century or more into adulthood, we keep forgetting that we won’t be around for much longer, and by no surprise we cannot get away no matter what happens!

Nelly

What is there

To the back stabber… again!

What is there

What is there if there’s no light off the sun?

It’s like a blind man with a song, unsung…

What is there when someone libels perpetually?

It’s like casting stones to break bones irefully

Nelly

Maybe there’s no light?

The fool is King, and the rest is just a pleasant song, indicating factual wars, and not just sporadic ancient revolutions on women’s equality.

 King

On this pad, I can see my writing, in my mind I can detect overwhelming thoughts to be verbalized. I can hear myself talk and sing out loud, endlessly… but does anyone else see me or hear me? Even if they do, will they just pretend they haven’t seen my hurting foot stuck under the heavy wheeled lorry? I’m still holding on to my written papers, which by now may all be scattered and blown away… can anyone else see them?

My voice could even routinely rhyme like in a droning song that plays in the background, as monotonous tones echoed in an empty room, no one ever notice, because there’s nothing there but emptiness and some drifting dust…

Still, silently the continuous routine swelling misinformation about my ‘being’ widens… but how would I know? I can hear them. I can hear them all just as I’ve heard them behind the heavy door from the end of the long hall, as they were thumped shut. I pretty well remember when I was a kid, doors shutting off right into my face. These girls just wanted to hang out among them and no one else was allowed in. The controversy was too strenuous, too exhausting, too draining. Thus the ceiling and its shadows became entertaining sceneries away from a poignant life surrounded by browbeats.

Was it intentionally done to hurt my feelings or were they dumfounded and inebriated by proud persuasion? I’ll forgive them if they might be suffering of some form of irrational syndrome, just like the zombies walking into a long path with sightlessness? But they weren’t suffering of any weakness on their high plinth. Sometimes in the past I have heard of a saying in French: “Dans le monde des aveugles, le fou est Roi” which means “Within the blind world, the fool is King” it was mostly current and popular during the battle of Orleans in France.

Charles VI became king at eleven years old, he had visible psychosis at the beginning in his mid-twenties, and soon enough he made very bad choices. Once known as Charles the Beloved, he was called Charles the Mad later in his reign. Apparently psychological illness had been passed on for several generations through his mother, Joanna of Bourbon, an extremely frustrated woman. Maybe as a woman, she had no rights, and the high ranked religious priest tortured her within antagonistic ruling and lack of liberty. It was well practiced in ancient times. History reports have revealed that in some countries women lived without liberty. We wouldn’t know now, but we do know that at the time women had no freedom, and when they demanded it, they were locked up and labelled as insane.

Reading these parts of history of France could explain the ongoing wars that never seemed to end and always blaming others for enticing them. I’m hinting out factual wars, and not just sporadic revolutions among gender equality.

During my grammar school years, I remember having read about these wars and the amazing Joan of Arc… but of course children that only read comic magazines wouldn’t know how to retain historical testimonies or get inquisitive to devour more literature, just to get informed by cheer curiosity, as I always did and still do.

“Maybe there’s no light? Maybe there’s no power,” as the songs goes:

Trip switch, trip switch

What we do when the power’s out.
What do we do when the lights go down.
What we do when the power’s out.
What do we do when the lights go.
Down, down, down, down, down, down.
When the lights go.
Down, down, down, down, down, down
Lights go.

Nelly

The Blind Watchmaker, by Richard Dawkins

An amazing review on Dawkins’ book – and his extension those interested who might be confronted with meticulous reasoning, leavened by inspiring riffs upon metaphor which has always been his brand. The book sets out to prove that the existence of all known biological structures and behaviours using the scientific method starting with basic physical laws and principles in totting up random mutation and natural selection… specially that the explanation does not require exclusive design…

“The basic idea of The Blind Watchmaker is that we don’t need to postulate a designer in order to understand life, or anything else in the universe.” (p. 147)

Philo on Books

The Blind Watchmaker

The Blind Watchmaker is a book about evolution, but not as much about the evolution/creationism conflict as one might expect. I kind of like that. I’ve read quite a few articles and books by scientists directly debating and debunking creationism, and absolutely there’s a place for that, but what’s pleasing about this book by Dawkins is that it’s more of a positive explanation and defense and appreciation of evolution, than an attack on creationism. It’s a celebration of science rather than an attack on anti-science.

Creationism is addressed explicitly here and there in passing, and of course much of what’s said in favor of evolution implicitly counters creationism, but the refutation of creationism is mostly a byproduct of the discussion of evolution, not its primary purpose. (Just as he implicitly and explicitly distinguishes his position from Lamarckism, certain interpretations of punctuated equilibrium, and other positions in the course of his…

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The Philosophy of Being Yourself

The Guardian published an interview with a nurse who worked with dying patients, and the thing people regretted the most on their deathbed was not having the courage to live life according to their own will. Many experienced that they had lived according to their environment’s expectations rather than how they themselves wanted. Thus, what they regretted is not exercising their own freedom.

Angry Foreigner

There’s people who say: “You can get away with saying certain things because you’re an immigrant.” Nonsense. There are individuals who sincerely believe that Im a nazi, and there have been for a long time even before I started making videos. I get called “racist” as easily as a white Swede, because I look and speak like a Swede and therefore I get treated like a Swede.

But even if you don’t look Swedish you can still be called racist. “Housenigger” or “Uncle Tom” is pretty common in Sweden if you’re an immigrant and only slightly to the right politically. Everybody catches shit when they speak their mind. The point is not to walk on eggshells your entire life and do your best to avoid ugly labels. The point is relating to other peoples words in a constructive manner.

konsten jpeg 1

First of all, other peoples words will only have as much…

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